An Unintended Consequence of a Billboard Ban in Hawaii

An unintended consequence of the billboard ban in Hawaii is the use of the shaka sign by local politicians.

The shaka sign and the billboard ban in Hawaii are inexorably linked together.

It’s no question that Hawaii has unparalleled natural beauty and scenery. This is why over 8 million tourists flock to Hawaii each year. Once here, they can enjoy and experience such memorable views. Arguably, one of the things enhancing the attractiveness of the Aloha State is the absence of billboard advertising. This is because of the billboard ban in Hawaii.

Creation of the Billboard Ban in Hawaii

In addition to Hawaii, three other states, Vermont, Maine, Alaska as well as some 1,500 towns throughout the country prohibit billboards. The organization most responsible for keeping the Aloha State clear of billboards has been The Outdoor Circle. This organization was primarily responsible for spearheading efforts banning billboards in Hawaii since 1927. The Outdoor Circle has also been actively involved in banning aerial advertising in Hawaii as well as supported its legality.

The Unintended Consequence

But Hawaii’s ban on billboards has had an unintended consequence that no one really expected. Politicians in Hawaii could not legally promote their candidacies through larger forms of signage. So one aspiring individual in 1968, named Charles Campbell, decided to carry such signs on his own person. Additionally, his campaign supporters and waved to cars passing by on the highways and streets in his community. This started Hawaii’s truly unique form of political campaigning, called sign waving. This form of campaigning proved to be extremely effective. Also, it was a lot cheaper than other forms of political advertising. As a result, virtually every politician in the State copied it and the practice took off.

Today, during each and every political season in Hawaii, you will see multitudes of people along Hawaii’s highways and byways carrying signs with the names of their favorite candidate and waving to cars passing buy. To add a unique touch of Hawaii, instead of simply waving hello to passersby, many sign wavers flash the iconic “shaka” sign with their hands.